Chip and Joanna Gaines Are Wealthy but Not the Wealthiest Home Improvement Stars

Home improvement reality stars usually teach viewers how to save a buck on home renovation, selling, and buying. But most are making some bucks— a lot of serious bucks.

Joanna Gaines and Chip Gaines
Joanna Gaines and Chip Gaines | Sean Zanni/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images

For instance, Chip and Joanna Gaines from Fixer Upper have become a household name for their no-nonsense, family-friendly approach to home transformations. For five years, the couple helped a slew of families create their dream home on a budget using their complementary approach to home building and design.

The couple has amassed a nice fortune in the process, each worth a cool $10 million apiece, according to GoBankingRates. In addition to their series, the couple’s vast company, Magnolia includes real estate, home improvement, and design services. With $20 million in combined wealth, the couple won’t have to worry about money. But they aren’t the wealthiest in the business.

Some home improvement gurus are worth more individually

While the couple is worth more together than a few other home renovation and real estate reality personalities, others have a net worth that exceeds just Chip or Joanna Gaines individually.

For instance, Christina Anstead, formerly of Flip or Flop holds

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L.A. County ends controversial PACE home improvement loan program

Los Angeles County has ended its controversial PACE home improvement loan program, a decision that follows years of criticism that the county enabled predatory lending and put people at risk of losing their homes.

County officials — who launched the PACE program in 2015 to fund energy- and water-efficient home improvements — said they made the decision after determining the program lacked adequate consumer protections.

Homeowners repeatedly alleged the private home improvement contractors who signed them up for PACE misrepresented how the financing would work, saddling them with loans they could not understand or afford.

The county also faced lawsuits alleging that government authorities failed to properly oversee the private lenders it partnered with to issue loans that, if unpaid, could lead to foreclosure.

The criticisms mirror complaints directed at other Property Assessed Clean Energy, or PACE, programs across California that fund environmentally friendly home improvements such as solar panels, heat-blocking roofs and low-flush toilets.

In response to widespread concern, both the county and state instituted reforms in recent years, including requiring that an ability-to-repay analysis be conducted and phones calls be made with homeowners to ensure they understood the financing.

Complaints over fraud, however, continued, including instances in

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Should We Be Considering Home Improvement Stocks?

The home improvement duopoly has been thriving amid this stay-at-home initiative. Those home projects we “never had time for” before the quarantine have just made their way to the top of priority lists. With summer coming fast, society stuck at home, and Home Depot (HD) and Lowe’s (LOW) remaining open, we have run out of excuses. Is it time to invest in these outperforming stocks? If we want in, how do we decide between LOW and HD?

Should We Still Consider Investing In Home Improvement?

The markets have priced in a good portion of the tailwinds that the “vital” home improvement giants have been a benefactor of. Both LOW and HD have outperformed the broader S&P 500, but have they run up too much? Is this boost in home improvement sales only a temporary jump?

Both Home Depot and Lowes reported year-over-year sales growth in Q1, boosted by the peculiar COVID tailwind. These home improvement stores are some of the few big box stores that were deemed essential by state officials, but there is more to these firms’ success narrative than just being essential amid this health crisis.

Both of these businesses have adopted an omnichannel solution that leverages digital

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Mixed Outlook for Retail Building Products Amid Coronavirus

The Building Products – Retail industry comprises U.S. home improvement retailers, manufactures of industrial and construction materials and distributors of wallboard and ceilings systems. Some of the industry participants also offer products and services for home decoration, repair and remodeling, and in-home delivery and installation services.

The industry players provide a wide array of products, ranging from cement or concrete foundation materials to roofing boards and shingles. The companies also sell lumber, insulation materials, drywall, plumbing fixtures, hard-surface flooring, lawn and garden, and decor products. Some players also deal in threaded fastener products, and manufactured and natural stone tiles. The industry players cater to professional homebuilders, sub-contractors, remodelers and consumers.

Let’s take a look at the industry’s three major themes:

  • The industry’s prospects remain closely tied to U.S. housing market conditions, and repair and remodeling (R&R) activity. The bleak near-term prospects of the housing market amid coronavirus-induced high unemployment and supply-side challenges are weighing on the industry participants’ profits. Weak demand for new commercial and residential buildings is anticipated to continue affecting the product pipelines of firms in the industry. Moreover, shelter-in-place orders and other end-market restrictions have affected many industrial activities. These could continue to hurt top lines of
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